Energy Efficiency: The Big Picture

    The superiority of natural gas translates directly into customer savings. Numbers can be deceptive. Energy efficiency ratings for home appliances, for instance, make it seem like electric appliances are more efficient than natural gas. But nothing could be further from the truth. When overall efficiency is considered alongside the cost to the consumer, natural gas wins hands down. “Evaluating energy use based on equipment efficiencies does not allow us to see the entire picture as it takes approximately three times as much energy in the electrical generation process to create one unit of usable energy than it does for natural gas,” said Michael Noll, an architect from Boston who is also the founder of archtoolbox.com, which provides technical tools for architects as well as advice on home efficiency and sustainability. To understand why natural gas almost always comes out on top in terms of overall efficiency and low prices for…
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  • Can Your Dryer Be a STAR

    Over the past two decades, clothes dryers have largely been left out of the energy-efficiency movement that revolutionized other household appliances like refrigerators, air conditioners and clothes washers. But that all changed when the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the arrival of ENERGY STAR certified clothes dryers at major retailers from a wide variety of […]
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  • Put Some Sizzle in Your Summer

    Looking for one more reason to buy that new natural gas grill this summer? By cooking outside during the summer months you can keep your kitchen (and entire house) cooler. Take your culinary skills to your grill, try some new techniques and work your air conditioner a little less at the same time. Options in […]
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  • Energy Wise

    U.S. households account for 17 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Watch the heat Home heating accounts for the biggest portion of household utility bills, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). To save both energy and dollars: Check for leaks and drafts around windows and doors. […]
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